Sermons For World Communion Sunday

Sermons for World Communion Sunday: In the Bible, partaking in communion is a representation of Christ’s love for us: He sacrificed his body as a sacrifice for us, and we participate in that love by assimilating the bread and wine into our bodies. But sharing isn’t only about taking part in something lovely; it’s also about taking part in one another. Because we all share the same food together when we take communion. “I am this,” “you are this,” and “we are this” are what we are claiming to be.

And saying “I” and “we” is what World Communion Sunday is all about. On this day, we remember that God has gathered His people, the followers of Jesus Christ, to demonstrate to the outside world what it means to be a part of His family. On this day, we get together to celebrate both our variety and our unity. We also remember that, despite the fact that we may originate from various nations, cultures, and traditions, Jesus unites us all because he is one body, bonded by the blood of the Lamb (1 Corinthians 12:13).

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sermons for world communion sunday

Sermons | St. David's United Church

sunday service opening prayer points

For this is my blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many for the forgiveness of sins.

For the blood of Christ, a testament:

In Hebrews 9:11-12, Jesus is referred to as “the mediator of a new covenant.” In other words, he was the person who made it possible for us to be in God’s presence again. This is why we celebrate Communion—it’s an opportunity for us to remember what Christ did for us on the cross, and how he has provided a way for us to experience his forgiveness.

Their cups were filled with wine as part of the Passover dinner that Jesus celebrated with his disciples (Matthew 26:27). At this period, it was customary among Jews to drink an alcoholic beverage known as “the cup of judgment” as a sign of remorse for those who had harmed God or others (Leviticus 10:17). The cup that Jesus gave us on Passover night wasn’t just a symbol; it was truly filled with a bitter substance similar to gall that, if we drank it, would destroy our souls (Psalm 69:21). However, because Jesus took those sins upon himself when he died on the cross, we can have peace and joy rather than being destroyed by our own sins. Serving Communion involves more than merely recalling the past; it also

And the cup of blessing that we bless, is it not a sharing in the blood of Christ? The bread that we break, is it not a sharing in the body of Christ?

The bread and wine are symbolic of Christ’s sacrifice for us.

The cup of blessing that we bless, is it not a sharing in the blood of Christ? The bread that we break, is it not a sharing in the body of Christ? Because there is one loaf of bread, we many be many persons, but we are all one body because there’s only one loaf.

In the same way also the cup after supper, saying, “This cup which is poured out for you is the new covenant in my blood” (Luke 22:20).

In him we live and move and have our being.

“In him we live and move and have our being,” says the apostle Paul in Acts 17:28. He had just finished his speech to the Athenians, who were fascinated by his teaching about God.

Paul spoke of God as a personal being who is not far from each one of us. “God is not far from each one of us,” he said (verse 27). We are “in him”—that is, we belong to him; and he is “in us.”

For as often as you eat this bread and drink the cup, you proclaim the Lord’s death until he comes.

The Lord’s Supper is a time of remembering and proclaiming.

Remembering is recalling something that happened in the past, such as an event or person. For example, you might remember your first trip to school when you were five years old, or the day that you graduated from high school.

Declaring something out loud for everyone to hear is known as proclaiming. When someone wins a contest, you might announce it, and on Valentine’s Day, you might declare your love for someone by gifting them flowers or chocolates. Christians who acknowledge Jesus Christ as Lord acknowledge that he died for our sins, which include both past and present transgressions, and that he will return for us in the future (1 Corinthians 11:26). Therefore, until he returns, we are proclaiming his death every time we remember him while sharing a meal together.

Because there is one loaf, we, who are many, are one body, for we all partake of the one loaf.

The bread we eat during Communion is not merely a symbol of Jesus’ body. It is the body of Christ, broken for us and shared among us. We are one body because we all partake of the same loaf, just as God’s love extends to all who accept it.

The bread reminds us that Jesus gave his life for us; it also reminds us that we have been given new life in Him, through His death and resurrection. As members of this great family of believers across the world—united by our faith in Christ—we can learn from each other how to live out our faith in different ways while still remaining unified as one body under God’s Son, Jesus Christ (1 Corinthians 12:12-13).

For even as the body is one and yet has many members, and all the members of the body, though they are many, are one body, so also is Christ. For by one Spirit we were all baptized into one body…and have all been made to drink of one Spirit.

For even as the body is one and yet has many members, and all the members of the body, though they are many, are one body, so also is Christ. For by one Spirit we were all baptized into one body…and have all been made to drink of one Spirit.

To understand this passage better, it helps to know what was happening in John’s life when he wrote it. He had fled Jerusalem after his friends were put to death there (we don’t know why). He was at a place called Patmos when Jesus appeared before him in visions and instructed him to write down what he saw there: letters addressed to seven churches in Asia Minor where his letters would later be read aloud during worship services by those who served as deacons.

Because John wrote the first letter while he was still on Patmos Island, it begins with “the revelation” rather than “a revelation.” The following four chapters detail another vision, this time depicting Jesus seated on His Father’s throne and surrounded by 24 elders, one for each tribe of Israel. These angels thank God for creating the creation, but they also quiz Him on the future course of events leading up to His return (Revelation 5-22). In this vision, we may see several things happening at once: While the crowds around Jesus worship him, angels come down from heaven with trumpets that play different notes according on their mission. Some trumpets announce judgment against sinners, while others offer news relevant to the kingdom of God.

The body-life exhibited by Jesus while He was on earth is to be duplicated in His followers. We too should “abide in Him”.

So, what does it mean to abide in Christ? To say that you are abiding in God is to declare yourself a member of His family and to admit your own helplessness apart from Him. You are trusting Him for everything you need, whether it be forgiveness or spiritual growth.

If you want to bear fruit like Jesus did, then you must let him be the teacher and guide for your life. If there is anything about yourself that prevents this kind of relationship with God, get rid of it! In other words: crucify yourself daily by denying self-will (that is, being controlled by our own desires).

Let Jesus be our example for how to abide in God.

Let Jesus be our example for how to abide in God.

We learn three things from the life of Jesus:

  • He came to teach us how to abide in God (Matthew 11:28-30).
  • We can learn from his teachings (John 14:6-7, 15:9).
  • And we can learn from his life (1 John 2:6-7).

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