Sermons For First Sunday Of Lent

Sermons for First Sunday of Lent: “Shrove Sunday” is the name of the first Sunday of Lent. The word “shrive,” which implies to confess one’s faults, is the ancestor of the word “shrove.” The Church requests that we confess our sins and seek priest absolution as we get ready for Holy Week. We are also urged to fast, pray more frequently, and go to Mass every day. These rituals assist us in beginning Holy Week with a heart that is unclouded and receptive to God’s grace. “Let fasting be the nourishment of repentance,” stated St. John Chrysostom in his homily for this day. “Let prayer be the garment; let faith be the shield; let hope be the helmet; and let charity be the sword.”

It’s crucial to keep in mind that Lent is about entirely submitting ourselves to God so that we might benefit from His love and mercy, not merely about giving up things.

You can also find topics like “free sermons on lent season” along with extensive write-ups that include topics like “i need a sermon for sunday”

free sermons on lent season

1st Sunday of Lent - Faithlife Sermons

Sermons for First Sunday of Lent

This is the day that the Lord has made;

This is the day that the Lord has made; let us rejoice and be glad in it.

let us rejoice and be glad in it.

The people are told that they have been delivered by God. This is good news for them, and they should rejoice! Their joy is the fruit of God’s faithfulness and love toward His people; their joy also reflects the fact that they have been given something to be glad about in their own deliverance from enemies. They even have reason to rejoice over the deliverance of their enemies.

Psalm 118.24

Psalm 118.24

The verse is a quotation from Psalm 118, which is also used in the Anglican liturgy, Catholic liturgy and Roman Catholic liturgy:

O Lord, save me; O Lord, grant me success!

Sermon for First Sunday of Lent, Year A Matthew 4.1-11

  • How are we to understand Jesus’ temptation?
  • What is the significance of being tempted by Satan?
  • What does it mean that Jesus was tempted to turn stones into bread, if He was hungry? Why would He need food in the desert where he had fasted for forty days and nights and could have asked God for anything He wanted?
  • What is the significance of Satan offering to make Jesus “a great king” (Matthew 4.8)?
  • How do we recognize when we’re being “tempted” by Satan? A few examples are given, but what else could be included here: thoughts, feelings, urges etc.
  • How should we respond when we’re tempted by our enemy, Satan (or whatever you call him).

The temptation of Jesus has been described as a tussle between Satan and God for the rule of the world.

The temptation of Jesus has been described as a tussle between Satan and God for the rule of the world. In this story, Satan takes on the form of a snake to tempt Eve to eat from the forbidden tree in Eden. He is also depicted as an angel who deceives people into believing that he is good when he really has ulterior motives (Luke 4:1-13).

Others say it is a contest between two deities on equal terms.

According to one group, it was a fight between equals. According to legend, God and Satan had equal power and were engaged in a battle to determine who would control the earth. These individuals think that since Jesus already had power over Satan and could have easily beaten him, he did not need to be crucified in order to atone for our sins. Others disagree, claiming that it is not a competition between two equal deities. Rather, God sent Jesus to die on the cross for us in order to deliver us from sin and death for all time. According to this theory, Jesus does not tempt us or drive us to sin (James 1.13; Luke 4.12; Genesis 22:1).

But neither can be true because God does not tempt people.

But neither can be true because God does not tempt people.

Temptation is a part of human experience, but what we mean by temptation is often misunderstood. When you are tempted to sin, it’s not God who causes your struggle; it’s the devil who tries to get you to commit sin. The temptation that Jesus faced in the desert was more than just physical hunger (Matthew 4:1-11). He was being tested—his faithfulness and ability to follow through on prayer were being put to the test in order for him to prove himself worthy for his ministry work on earth. Even though he was utterly exhausted and vulnerable after forty days without food or water, he did not succumb to self-pity or resentment toward God when his request seemed unanswered; rather, he remained steadfastly focused on his mission as the Messiah (1 Peter 5:8).

This understanding of what happened in Matthew 4 helps us better understand why Jesus allowed himself to experience suffering throughout his life on earth even though he was perfectly innocent before God. It also teaches us how patience and perseverance can lead us further down a path that yields spiritual growth instead of despairing over our circumstances and giving up hope for something better in our lives

James 1.13; Luke 4.12; Genesis 22.1

James 1.13

Let no one say when he is tempted, “I am being tempted by God,” for God cannot be tempted with evil and he himself tempts no one.

Luke 4.12 (NRSV)

Now Jesus was about thirty years old when he began his ministry. He was the son, so it was thought, of Joseph son of Heli and Mary, who was descended from David’s son Nathan through her second husband Zechariah.

Nor do they have to compete with each other!

The Bible suggests that God is in a position of absolute power, which runs counter to the notion that the two are on an equal footing. The Lord delivers the word of command; he makes kings and governors, for instance, according to Psalm 110:1. This verse describes God as one who needs no other authority but Himself and who does not need any king or earthly ruler to speak for Him. This can be compared to Satan’s attempt to speak for God (see Isaiah 14:12-14).

Similarly, Deuteronomy 14:2 makes clear that there is no contest between these two beings. It says “you shall fear only the Lord your God.” In this verse, we see again that there is no contest between these two because you are only supposed to fear (reverence) one deity—in this case it happens to be Yahweh/God!

Christ has already conquered death on behalf of us all by his cross and resurrection, so there is no contest.

Jesus did not need to prove his power. He was God, and all power was his. He could have used that power to defeat death on the cross in a moment’s time, but he chose not to do so. Why? Because he knew that by submitting himself to death, he would be able to save us from our own sinfulness and death through his resurrection from the dead. Jesus’ victory over death is seen in his obedience (John 14:31), love for us (John 13:34), and death on the cross (Romans 5:8).

Ephesians 1.20-23; Hebrews 2.14-15; Revelation 5.5, 12-14

  • The devil is not a match for God.
  • Moses and the Israelites were led out of slavery into freedom.
  • Jesus was baptized by John.
  • John the Baptist prepared people for Jesus.
  • Jesus prepared himself for his own baptism in the desert, which was a place where he could meet with God and be strengthened by him (see Matthew 4:1-11).

What then was going on in this desert encounter?

The first thing to notice about this encounter is that Jesus resisted the temptation to have an easy life. In our modern world, it is easy for us to think that if we just have everything go our way, then we will be happy. However, Jesus knew what was coming and he did not want to postpone his mission in order to enjoy his time on earth more fully.

Jesus was not required to justify himself to God or to others. The world’s kingdoms, celebrity, and human adulation were all things the devil tried very hard to lure Jesus with, but none of them were significant enough for him to abandon his mission on earth and live off them indefinitely. There were no advantages at all for him, and they would only serve to keep him from doing his duties as the Messiah (Messiah is the Hebrew word for “anointed one”).

Finally, we must understand that Jesus was not trying to get Satan or any other evil spirit(s) serve him; rather he wanted those fullfilled by God alone who would follow His will despite suffering and rejection from others during their lives here on earth.”

The desert was a place to meet with God and receive instruction for the future Exodus journey – for the Israelites, it was where Moses received the Law from God before leading them out of slavery into freedom, and for Jesus it was where John the Baptist prepared people to repent and be baptized by him, Luke 3.3 and where he prepared himself for his own baptism, Luke 3.21-22; Mark 1.9-11

The desert was a place to meet with God and receive instruction for the future Exodus journey – for the Israelites, it was where Moses received the Law from God before leading them out of slavery into freedom, and for Jesus it was where John the Baptist prepared people to repent and be baptized by him, Luke 3.3 and where he prepared himself for his own baptism, Luke 3.21-22; Mark 1.9-11

In the wilderness, Jesus engaged in a ferocious spiritual struggle that centered on his connection with his Father (Luke 4.1-13). Apart from occasional advice from God’s sent angels, David had no other human company or direction during this experience (Mark 1:13). When Jesus was tempted in the desert, he had a profound sense of both God’s presence and absence, which allowed him to discover more about himself than anyone else could at the time.

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