Jewish wedding prayer in hebrew

The Jewish wedding ceremony is a beautiful and meaningful event that takes place in the presence of family, friends and loved ones. The key to a successful Jewish wedding lies in the couple’s desire to honor the traditions of the Jewish faith.

In order to properly prepare for a Jewish marriage, it is important to understand the customs and traditions associated with this momentous occasion. This article will discuss some of these traditions and what they mean to those who practice Judaism as their faith.

There is no one prescribed format for a Jewish wedding ceremony. Each wedding must be planned by the couple themselves with input from family members who officiate over the ceremony itself. In fact, many couples choose not to have Rabbis involved at all because they feel that their own vows are more meaningful than anything a Rabbi could say on their behalf during such an important day in their lives together as husband and wife (Klein).

The Jewish wedding ceremony is a celebration of love, commitment, and family. The ceremony takes place under the chuppah (wedding canopy), which symbolizes the home that the bride and groom will build together. The bride traditionally wears a white dress, and the couple is often surrounded by flowers as they exchange vows and rings in front of their family and friends.

The ceremony begins with a blessing from the rabbi or cantor before the wedding party enters the room. Then, when everyone is seated and quieted, the groom walks his bride into the room under an ornate canopy held by friends and relatives. The groom then escorts her to stand beside him at center stage as he recites his vows: “I’ll betroth you unto myself for ever.” He then places a ring on her finger while reciting: “With this ring I thee wed; according to Jewish law I now pronounce us husband and wife.”

The bride then recites her vows: “Behold how good and pleasant it is for brothers to dwell together in unity! It is like precious oil upon the head, running down on Aaron’s beard.” She places a ring on his finger while reciting: “With this ring I thee wed; according to Jewish law

Prayer for a Jewish Wedding

Dear G-d, we thank you for the love that brought us together. We thank you for the opportunity to make each other happy. We thank you for bringing us to a crossroads in our lives where we were able to meet one another and find such happiness together.

We pray that your presence will be with us on our wedding day, and with us throughout our marriage. Blessed are You, G-d of Israel, who sanctifies couples in love and marriage. Amen!

The traditional Hebrew transliteration and English translation of the Seven Blessings/Sheva Brachot follow:

  1. Blessed are You, Adonai our God, Ruler of the Universe, Creator of the fruit of the vine.
    Phonetic Hebrew transliteration: Baruch Atah Adonai Eloheinu Melech Ha-Olam, boreh p’ri ha-gafen.
  2. Blessed are You, Adonai, our God, Ruler of the universe, Who has created everything for your glory.
    Phonetic Hebrew transliteration: Baruch Atah Adonai Eloheinu Melech Ha-Olam, she-hakol barah lichvodo.
  3. Blessed are You, Adonai, our God, Ruler of the universe, Creator of Human Beings.
    Phonetic Hebrew transliteration: Baruch Atah Adonai Eloheinu Melech Ha-Olam, yotzer ha-adam.
  4. Blessed are You, Adonai, our God, Ruler of the universe, Who has fashioned human beings in your image, according to your likeness and has fashioned from it a lasting mold. Blessed are You Adonai, Creator of Human Beings.
    Phonetic Hebrew transliteration: Baruch Atah Adonai Eloheinu Melech Ha-Olam, asher yatzar et ha-adam betzalmo, b’tzelem dmut tavnito, vehitkon lo mimenu binyan adei ad. Baruch Atah Adonai yotzer ha-adam.
  5. Bring intense joy and exultation through the ingathering of Her children (Jerusalem). Blessed are You, Adonai, are the One who gladdens Zion (Israel) through Her children’s return.
    Phonetic Hebrew transliteration: Sos tasis v’tagel ha-akarah, b’kibbutz bane’ha letocha b’simchaa. Baruch Atah Adonai, mesame’ach tzion b’vaneha.
  6. Gladden the beloved companions as You gladdened Your creatures in the garden of Eden. Blessed are You, Adonai, Who gladdens this couple.
    Phonetic Hebrew transliteration: Sameach te-samach re’im ahuvim, k’samechacha yetzircha b’Gan Eden mi-kedem. Baruch Atah Adonai, mesame’ach chatan v’kalah.
  7. Blessed are You, Adonai, our God, Ruler of the universe, Who created joy and gladness, loving couples, mirth, glad song, pleasure, delight, love, loving communities, peace, and companionship. Adonai, our God, let there soon be heard in the cities of Judah and the streets of Jerusalem the sound of joy and the sound of gladness, the voice of the loving couple, the sound of the their jubilance from their canopies and of the youths from their song-filled feasts. Blessed are You Who causes the couple to rejoice, one with the other.
    Phonetic Hebrew transliteration: Baruch Atah Adonai Eloheinu Melech Ha-Olam, asher barah sasson v’simcha, chatan v’kalah, gila rina, ditza v’chedva, ahava v’achava, v’shalom v’re’ut. Me-hera Adonai Eloheinu yishama b’arei yehudah u’vchutzot yerushalayim, kol sasson v’eKol simcha, kol chatan v’ekol kalah, kol mitzhalot chatanim me-chupatam, u’nearim mimishte neginatam. Baruch Atah Adonai mesame’ach chatan im hakalah.

The Seven Blessings (Sheva Brachot)

The Jewish wedding ceremony is one of the most beautiful and meaningful events in a person’s life, and it’s important to ensure that all participants are comfortable and feel included, regardless of their religious background. While some couples choose to have a Jewish officiant preside over their wedding ceremony, others may wish to include elements from other traditions or even create their own unique blend of different traditions.

This guide will walk you through some ways you can incorporate parts of the Jewish wedding ceremony into your own ceremony.

Blessed is the one who created the fruit of the vine. Bless the two of you who come out of long traditions of struggling to find out what it is to be human. May you be full of the wine of life. May the life force and the knowledge of the human heart always be with you.

Blessed is the One. All creation mirrors your splendor and reflects your radiance. Bless the two of you. May the two of you know that all beauty comes from the Great Heart, and may you always live in its radiance.

Blessed is the one who created human beings. Bless the two of you. May you know it all–joy and struggle, beauty and sorrow, sweat, tears, solitude, companionship, laughter, and ecstasy. May your marriage be strong enough to support you to experience whatever you must as you come to know yourselves and each other and to discover the entire range of your humanity in the process of soul-making.

Blessed is the one who created us in the divine image, so we may live, love, and perpetuate life. Bless the two of you. May you delight in the wonder and impossibility of the fact that you are so similar and so different–may the difficulty and enormous pleasure of being a man and woman continually fascinate and engage you and be the source of your bonding.

Blessed is the one who brings people together and unites the divided. In joy, we have come to witness this marriage of many cultures. It is said that everyone gets married at a wedding. Bless the two of you who bring us together through your union today.

Blessed is the one who rejoices that the love between these two people as the very first love in the Garden. Bless the two of you who recreate the world for us and for yourselves. May your love be as old and as new as the first love, and may you also bring new life, in all its forms, into the world.

Blessed is the creation of joy and celebration, lover and beloved, gladness and jubilation, pleasure and delight, love and solidarity, friendship and peace. Soon may we hear in the streets of the city and the paths of the fields the voice of joy, the voice of gladness, the voice of a lover, the voice of beloved, the triumphant voice of lovers from the canopy, and the voice of youths from their feasts of song. Blessed is the joy of lovers, one with another.

Conclusion

In conclusion, there are many things that are unique to the Jewish wedding ceremony. The most important part of the ceremony is when the bride and groom say their vows to each other. The vows that they take are sacred and binding, and they are meant to last a lifetime.

Thank you for reading this post. I hope it was helpful to you and that you learned something new about Jewish wedding prayers. If you have any questions, please feel free to leave them below in the comments, and I will get back to you as soon as possible!

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