King In Old Testament

Sifting through the old testament for great lessons can be challenging for many Christians and churches. So why not get our disciples to look at it in a different novel way? I’m sure if you’ve been in church training, the routines are all known; either the King James version or whichever was fed to that generation being taught. The purpose of this series is to highlight some of the best lessons, quotes, characters with more than just a simple mission of just retelling stories we’re all familiar with. This series will be taking things apart and compiling them. And it will be up to you as readers and learners to determine what you get out of these few attempts at helping us take these complicated lessons and break them into something digestible.

King in the Old Testament is a king who was anointed with holy oil and declared to be the legitimate ruler of God’s kingdom on Earth. It was not until King Saul that the nation of Israel was truly organized as a Kingdom, yet it was both Saul and David who were crowned by Samuel to be King in the Old Testament.

King In Old Testament

Introduction

King In Old Testament

In the Old Testament, there are many kings who are mentioned. Some of these kings are well-known and others are not. One of the most famous kings in the Old Testament is King David. He was a great king who ruled over Israel for many years. He is one of the most important people in Jewish history because he wrote many Psalms and made improvements to Jerusalem, which became known as the city of David.

Another important king in Jewish history is King Solomon. He was another great ruler and built a temple for God on Mount Zion, which is now called Solomon’s Temple. This temple was destroyed during the Babylonian Exile but rebuilt by Zerubbabel after the Jews returned from captivity. These two kings were very important leaders who helped shape Israel into what it is today, which is why they have been remembered throughout history as great leaders and heroes to their people.

King David’s Sin with Bathsheba

King David’s sin with Bathsheba is one of the most infamous stories in the Bible. In short, David seduces Bathsheba, who is already married, and then has her husband killed in battle so that he can take her for himself.

This story highlights one of the major problems with King David’s character: his infidelity. Though Bathsheba was not the first woman he had an affair with, she was certainly the most famous. This act of adultery and murder caused a great deal of pain and suffering for all involved, and ultimately led to David’s downfall.

The Golden Calf Incident

When the Israelites were wandering in the desert, they grew restless and asked Aaron to build them a god to lead them. So Aaron gathered up all the gold rings and earrings from the people and fashioned a golden calf. The people worshipped it and sacrificed to it, even though God had specifically told them not to make any idols.

This incident is often called the Golden Calf Incident because of the central role that the golden calf played in it. It’s one of the most well-known stories from the Old Testament because it’s a classic example of human nature: even when we know what God wants us to do, we still sometimes choose to do what we want instead.

Joash

  • You are the king of Judah.
  • Your name is Joash.
  • You are the son of Amaziah and grandson of Uzziah, who was a good king. His name means “strength of Yahweh” (2 Kings 14:26).
  • And you have been a good king too! You were merciful to your subjects because you were merciful to God, as he showed mercy to you after your father’s death and gave him another chance to rule over Judah (2 Kings 12:1-3).

Amaziah of Judah

Amaziah was a good king because he was a good warrior.

Amaziah was a good king because he was a good leader.

Amaziah was a good king because he was a good example to others.

Saul

The first king of a united kingdom of Israel was Saul, who was the son of Kish, a Benjamite. He was tall and good looking, and he also had a reputation for being a mighty warrior.

But Saul’s reign didn’t last long because he made several mistakes that cost him his throne. First off, he disobeyed God by failing to destroy all the animals from the Amalekites’ herds when God told him to do so in 1 Samuel 15:1-3 (NIV). Secondly, he refused to listen when Samuel warned him not to allow an evil spirit from an evil medium possess his son Jonathan in 1 Samuel 28:3 (NIV) Finally, during battle against Amalekites and Philistines at Mt Gilboa when faced with certain death by his own hand or having his head cut off by Philistines if he did not die by himself; instead of killing himself as instructed by God through Samuel earlier on during their last meeting together before parting ways until their next meeting at Ramah where they would be reunited once again after Samuel dies

David

David, the second king of Israel, was a great leader. He was also a musician, poet and warrior. King David is an example of everything that makes a good king: he fought for his people but also helped them start their lives over again; he showed kindness to everyone around him and led by example instead of ordering people around; he cared about every person in his kingdom—even if they weren’t related to him—and loved them like family members would love each other.

David is also a good example for fathers today because he showed how much he loved his children even when they made mistakes or disobeyed him (1 Samuel 15:11-12). Even though it was hard sometimes to punish them after they disobeyed him (as parents sometimes experience), David still did what needed to be done so that his family could thrive together as one unit rather than falling apart due to bad influences outside their home

Solomon

Solomon was the fourth king of Israel and the second king of the United Kingdom of Israel and Judah. He was born in Jerusalem, the capital of Israel. He was the son of King David and Bathsheba, the daughter of Eliam. Solomon’s reign began in 970 BCE and ended in 931 BCE after his death at age 50.

Rehoboam

Rehoboam was the son of King Saul and grandson of King David.

He was the first king of the united kingdom, which is why he’s important in Israel’s history.

However, Rehoboam wasn’t very good at being king. He didn’t have his grandfather’s wisdom or kindness; instead, he became arrogant and selfish because he thought all his subjects would love him just because he was their leader (which isn’t true).

As a result, many people rebelled against him—even one of his own sons!

Abijah

Abijah was the son of Rehoboam and Maacah, the daughter of Absalom. Abijah was the second king of the United Monarchy of Israel.

Abijah inherited a divided kingdom from his father, Rehoboam (1 Kings 12:16) at age 16 months after Rehoboam’s death on November 14th, 926 BCE. The division between Judah and Israel led to a civil war between Abijah and Jeroboam II (1 Kings 14:15-16).

During his reign there was an invasion by Shishak I of Egypt who conquered Jerusalem along with all its wealth (1 Kings 14:25). However, many scholars believe that this invasion occurred during Asa’s reign instead since Shishak had already invaded Jehoahaz’ reign according to 2 Chronicles 12:2-24).

Asa

Asa was a good king. He followed the Lord and was a good leader, but he was also a good man and a good example for those who would follow him. Asa did what he needed to do to keep his kingdom from falling apart during his reign, but he also did it with integrity and honesty.

Jehoshaphat

Jehoshaphat was the king of Judah. He reigned for 25 years. He did not follow God’s law and worshipped idols. Jehoshaphat was not a good king, leader or man.

Jehoram

Jehoram also known as Joram (reigned 851-842 BC) was King of Israel. He was the son of Ahab, king of Israel, and Jezebel. His father made a covenant with the Lord; however, he did not keep it. Jehoram continued to serve Baal and Asherah even after his father’s death and the time when his mother Queen Jezebel died. He became king at age 32 years old when his father died after reigning for 12 years in Samaria (2 Kings 3:4).

Jehoram was an evil king who killed many prophets of God including Elijah (1 Kings 18:4). The prophet Elisha told his servant Gehazi that someone would kill him because he had spat in front of him (2 Kings 2:9-10). Gehazi found out that it was Ahaziah who had done this so he went out to meet him along with Jehoram while they were hunting together in Beth Shemesh Valley near Mount Gilboa where a battle broke out between them killing many people on both sides including Ahaziah himself who perished from being struck by an arrow shot by one of his own soldiers (2 Kings 9:24-27).

Ahaziah of Judah

Ahaziah was the son of Athaliah, who was the daughter of Omri. That means that Ahaziah was the grandson of Omri and great-grandson of David.

It’s important to note that Ahaziah’s reign as King over Judah lasted only one year. This happened because his mother committed treason against him and sought to kill him (2 Chronicles 22:7). According to 2 Kings 8:26-27, she sent assassins after her son with orders to destroy him and make sure he never took power over Israel again!

Athaliah

Athaliah was the daughter of Ahab and Jezebel, who were wicked kings. Athaliah was married to Joram, the son of Jehoshaphat. After her husband died, she became queen of Judah for six years (841-835 B.C.). She was a very wicked queen because she murdered all the heirs to the throne so that she could keep power for herself.

Sa;u, David, Solomon and Asa were the best kings

The first king of Israel was Saul, who was chosen by God to lead His people. He was a good king and did many good things for Israel, but he made one mistake: he disobeyed God by not killing all the Amalekites when God told him to do so (1 Samuel 15).

David was the second king of Israel; he succeeded Saul after defeating Goliath in battle. David is remembered as a great warrior, musician and poet whose love for God propelled him throughout his life. Solomon was chosen by Nathan to succeed David because he showed wisdom beyond his years during their conversation when discussing how best to build a temple for God’s glory (2 Samuel 2).

Conclusion

In conclusion, we can see that the kings in our top ten list were all well liked by God. They were called to rule over Israel at a time when it was under threat and they were able to keep God’s people safe. The best king of all was definitely David because he loved God so much and did everything in his power to show it.

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