How Long Did It Take To Write The New Testament

How long did it take to write the New Testament?

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Close to two thousand years later, the New Testament is a collection of 27 books written for various purposes across an expansive span of time. The first book in the New Testament, the Gospel of Luke, was written around 65 AD., and the last, Revelation, was not fully completed until 96 AD. It’s safe to say that this collection took quite some time to compile!

How Long Did It Take To Write The New Testament

Introduction

How long did it take to write the New Testament?

The answer is, “We don’t know.”

It’s a complicated question, and an important one—and for the last several centuries, there have been a lot of different answers. But recently, historians have been getting closer to the truth about how long it took to write the New Testament.

Although we can’t tell exactly how long it took to write the New Testament, there are some things we can say with certainty. For example:

-The writing was done by multiple authors over several decades

-The authors were not writing as they went along (they didn’t sit down one day and say “I’m going to write a book”)

-The authors were not all eyewitnesses of Jesus’ life and death (some of them may have met him)

The Various Books of the New Testament

There are 27 books in the New Testament, which were written over a period of approximately 60 years. The first book, the Gospel of Matthew, was written around A.D. 80, and the last book, the Book of Revelation, was written around A.D. 140.

The New Testament books can be divided into four categories: gospels, history, letters, and apocalypse. There are four gospels—Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John—which tell the story of Jesus’ life and teachings. The book of Acts is a history of the early church after Jesus’ death and resurrection. The 21 letters in the New Testament were all written by Paul except for eight: Hebrews, James, 1-2 Peter, and 3 John. The Apocalypse (or Revelation) is a prophetic book that describes end times events.

The Process of Writing the New Testament

The New Testament was written over the course of several decades, with the earliest books being written in the mid-1st century. The latest book, Revelation, was written in the late 1st century or early 2nd century.

During this time, there were many different Christian communities in different parts of the world. Each community had its own collection of writings that they considered authoritative. There was no one canon of Scripture that was universally recognized by all Christians.

As time went on, certain books came to be widely accepted by most Christians as having authority. These books were eventually collected together and became what we now know as the New Testament.

The Time Frame for Writing the New Testament

The New Testament was written over the course of several decades, with the earliest books being composed in the 50s AD and later ones in the 2nd century. The exact time frame for each book is difficult to determine, as there is often debate over when they were actually written. However, scholars generally agree that the vast majority of the New Testament was likely composed between 70-100 AD.

Why the New Testament Was Written

The New Testament was written for a number of reasons. First and foremost, it was written to record the life and teachings of Jesus Christ. The authors of the New Testament were eyewitnesses to Jesus’ ministry or were close friends of those who were. They wanted to make sure that the story of Jesus was preserved for future generations.

In addition, the New Testament was written to provide guidance for Christians in their daily lives. The letters included in the New Testament were addressed to specific churches or individuals and addressed specific issues they were facing. For example, Paul’s letter to the Romans deals with the issue of salvation by grace alone.

Finally, the New Testament was written to proclaim the Good News that through Jesus Christ, God offers forgiveness and eternal life to all who believe in him. This is the message that we find throughout the pages of the New Testament – from Matthew’s account of Jesus’ birth to John’s vision of Christ’s return at the end of Revelation.

Who Wrote the New Testament?

The New Testament was written by a variety of authors over the course of several decades. The earliest books, such as the Gospel of Mark, were probably written in the late first century. Other books, such as the Epistle to the Hebrews, were probably written in the early second century.

The New Testament was not written as one continuous narrative. Rather, it is a collection of documents that were written at different times and for different audiences. Nevertheless, there is a common thread that runs throughout the New Testament: the story of Jesus Christ and his teachings.

There are four main categories of New Testament writings: gospels, Acts, epistles, and Revelation. The gospels tell the story of Jesus’ life, death, and resurrection. The book of Acts tells the story of the early church after Jesus’ ascension into heaven. The epistles are letters written by various authors to instruct and encourage Christians in their faith. Revelation is a prophetic book that describes God’s ultimate victory over evil.

While there is some debate about who wrote certain books of the New Testament, there is general agreement among scholars about which books were written by which authors. For example, it is widely accepted that Paul wrote several epistles, including Romans, 1 and 2 Corinthians, Galatians, Philippians, 1 and 2 Timothy, Titus, and Philemon. Other well-known authors include Luke (who wrote both the Gospel of Luke and Acts

We don’t know when the first Gospel was written.

Most scholars believe that Mark’s Gospel was written in the late first century (c. 70-80 CE). Some even think it could have been written as early as 60 CE, just after Jesus’ death.

Mark is thought to be the first gospel written because of its small size (only about 16,000 words) and its lack of emphasis on Jesus’ birth and childhood stories. It also doesn’t include any parables or other teachings from Jesus’ ministry. Instead, it focuses mainly on his last days—his ministry in Jerusalem, his arrest and trial, crucifixion and resurrection—with only a brief section at the end describing Jesus’ ascension into heaven after 40 days on earth following his resurrection from death. The author was clearly a Gentile (someone who was not Jewish), since he didn’t understand Jewish customs very well at all; most likely he was writing for Gentiles who were interested in learning more about this Jewish rabbi named Yeshua bar Yosef who had recently died but had somehow risen again three days later!

The most popular theory is that Mark originally wrote this gospel while living in Rome sometime during Nero’s reign (54-68 CE). This makes sense considering how many Roman references appear throughout it: “the chief priests” become “the high priest”; 10 pieces of silver becomes 15 coins; Pilate becomes Pontius Pilate; Herod Antipas becomes Herod King Agrippa I; etcetera

Pauline texts were produced between AD 50 and AD 65, but scholars are not agreed about which of Paul’s letters were written first.

Pauline texts were produced between AD 50 and AD 65, but scholars are not agreed about which of Paul’s letters were written first. Some think that his earliest letter was 1 Thessalonians (written around AD 50), while others argue that it was Galatians (written around AD 55).

Paul’s letters were written to specific churches and individuals, but they were not written in chronological order. For example, 1 Corinthians was probably the last of Paul’s letters to be written before 2 Corinthians and Romans.

A good estimate for when the New Testament books were written is between AD 50 and AD 120.

Due to the fact that the New Testament books were written by eyewitnesses, they provide a better account of Jesus’ life and ministry than any other ancient historical text. The best evidence indicates that they were written between AD 50 and AD 120.

There are several lines of evidence that point to this conclusion:

  • The gospels were written in the first century. This can be determined from internal evidence within each gospel (names and places mentioned), as well as external sources such as Josephus and Pliny the Younger. Both writers confirm that these events happened before their time (AD 90-120) without mentioning them specifically but referring only to “the book” or “the history.”
  • Most scholars agree that Jesus died sometime between 30 CE–33 CE, with most saying 33 CE was probably closer to his death date than 30 CE based on John 19:14 (“It was about noon”).

This means he died at least three years before Pontius Pilate’s term ended (19–26 CE). It also means he died at least five years before Jerusalem fell in 70 CE during Roman Emperor Vespasian’s reign (69–79 CE). If this is true then it also follows that all four Gospels were already being circulated by then since none seem aware of later events until after 70 C E

Some scholars think that the Gospels were not written down until around AD 70-100, 40-70 years after the death of Jesus.

Some scholars think that the Gospels were not written down until around AD 70-100, 40-70 years after the death of Jesus. This is a long time to wait before writing down an eyewitness account of one of history’s most important people. It would be like telling your grandkids about something that happened when they were four years old by saying “I remember it like it was yesterday.”

So what do we know about who wrote these books? We know that Matthew and Luke used Mark as one of their sources, but Mark was not an eyewitness either. He heard stories from Peter as well as others who had been there with Jesus during his ministry on earth (1 Pet 5:13). So even though we don’t have any direct evidence regarding authorship, it seems likely that Matthew, Mark and Luke all were written after AD 70-100 by people who may or may not have known Jesus himself while he was alive on Earth.

There is very little agreement among scholars about when Paul wrote his letters.

There is little agreement among scholars about when Paul wrote his letters. The first letter to the Corinthians, for example, is thought by many scholars to have been written between AD 50 and AD 65, but some people believe it may have been written as late as AD 95 or even later. This section briefly explains why there is such disagreement about the dates of Paul’s letters and why we can’t be more precise than this in dating them.

The same general principle applies to all New Testament books: they were produced between AD 50 and 120, with most scholars agreeing that they were composed within this period—but again, this leaves room for wide disagreement (a few decades at either end).

Why do these dates matter? They don’t really matter very much unless you’re doing historical research; what matters more is how the authors use their sources.

The early churches did not have a New Testament as we know it, but they did have multiple collections of letters and gospels to read out loud during worship.

The early churches did not have a New Testament as we know it, but they did have multiple collections of letters and gospels to read out loud during worship. These early gatherings are called “catholic” or “universal” (meaning worldwide) because the early Christians were trying to spread their faith across the known world.

In these meetings, believers would gather together and read aloud from these different books.

Conclusion

If you have any questions about this topic, please feel free to contact me. You can read more on my website or follow me on Twitter at @NT_Expert. I’d also love to hear what you think of this article in the comments section below! Thanks for reading!

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