Divine Mercy In The Bible

Divine Mercy In The Bible: The Divine Mercy in the Bible program is the complete study of the scriptural roots of Divine Mercy in Christ himself, in His Sacred Heart and as reflected through the Church. It details how Divine Mercy, rooted in Scripture and given to us through the Mystical Body of Christ, always has been and always will be central to the lives of all Christians––both individually and collectively––right up to and including our final encounter with God’s infinite mercy at the end of time. Divine Mercy in the Bible is an article that was inspired by both St. Faustina’s Diary and the teachings of Jesus Christ as given through Fr. Michael Gaitley in his book, The Divine Mercy Companion. Divine Mercy (also known as Divine Mercy of the Merciful Lord or The Divine Mercy) is a book of teachings written by Saint Maria Faustina Kowalska and published posthumously in 1935 in Polish, later translated into other languages. “Divine Mercy” is a motif central to Bible. o what you may have heard, Divine Mercy is not something new being widely promoted today by Catholics. To be more specific, I mean the Biblical basis and foundation of Divine Mercy. The following is a list of ten scriptures in the Bible that point to Jesus as our source of Divine Mercy: Divine Mercy is central to the spirituality of St Faustina Kowalska. Her Diary entry today, Sunday 28 January 1935, described it as ‘the greatest gift of God’ , and said that one word from Jesus expressing mercy to the world would be enough .The Divine Mercy refers to the merciful love of God towards the people. It is not a prayer or devotion. It is a promise by Jesus Christ to show mercy to those who pray and are faithful to Him and His Church. There is no condition that needs to be fulfilled before accepting the mercy of Christ. The Divine Mercy is a message given to Saint Faustina Kowalska by Jesus. This message tells us that His way of forgiving us is boundless. By praying the Chaplet of Mercy, souls will obtain mercy during the fourth period of twenty centuries after Christ.

You can also find topics like Types Of Mercy In The Bible along with extensive write-ups like Cry For Mercy Bible Verse.

Types Of Mercy In The Bible

Cry For Mercy Bible Verse.

The original Greek phrase translated “the Divine” is το θειον (to Theion). In context, “Divine” (θειον), even though it is an adjective, refers to the Divine God, who isn’t made of metal or stone. Paul is telling them that they have been worshiping pieces of metal and stone, not the truly Divine Creator God.

Divine Mercy In The Bible

When discussing “the Divine” with Hindus or Buddhists, do you address their pieces of metal and stone, or do you “respect” their religion?
 

ACTS 17:30-31 30 “Truly, these times of ignorance God overlooked, but now commands all men everywhere to repent, 31 because He has appointed a day on which He will judge the world in righteousness by the Man whom He has ordained. He has given assurance of this to all by raising Him from the dead.”

What does Paul say about the timing?
“Truly, these times of ignorance God overlooked, but now commands all men everywhere to repent” (Acts 17:30).

Why “now” (Acts 17:30)?
Since Jesus died to pay for our sins, both salvation – God “has determined their preappointed times and the boundaries of their dwellings, so that they should seek the Lord, in the hope that they might grope for Him and find Him” (Acts 17:26-27) – and judgment – “He has appointed a day on which He will judge the world in righteousness by the Man whom He has ordained” (Acts 17:31) – were at hand.

ACTS 17:32-34 32 And when they heard of the resurrection of the dead, some mocked, while others said, “We will hear you again on this matter.” 33 So Paul departed from among them. 34 However, some men joined him and believed, among them Dionysius the Areopagite, a woman named Damaris, and others with them.

Why didn’t Paul get a chance to explain more about Jesus?
They balked when they heard about His resurrection: “And when they heard of the resurrection of the dead, some mocked, while others said, “We will hear you again on this matter. So Paul departed from among them” (Acts 17:32).

Why would “the resurrection of the dead” (Acts 17:32) make them balk?
Greek philosophers and intellectuals valued the mind and logic, and viewed the physical body as worthless and expendable. The notion of a bodily resurrection was incomprehensible to them.

Does this mean Paul didn’t get the chance to share the Gospel?
No, some of those who heard Paul followed him out and undoubtedly heard about Jesus and His cross before believing: “However, some men joined him and believed, among them Dionysius the Areopagite, a woman named Damaris, and others with them” (Acts 17:34). Paul’s address at the Areopagus identified the hearers for whom God’s “preappointed times” (Acts 17:26) to “seek the Lord … and find Him” (Acts 17:27) had arrived.

Divine Mercy In The Bible

Psalm 89:5–7 says, “The heavens praise your wonders, LORD, your faithfulness too, in the assembly of the holy ones. For who in the skies above can compare with the LORD? Who is like the LORD among the heavenly beings? In the council of the holy ones God is greatly feared; he is more awesome than all who surround him.” These verses present a divine council: heavenly beings referred to as “the council of the holy ones.” Psalm 82:1 also indicates that “God has taken his place in the divine council” (Psalm 82:1, ESV). The “divine council” is also called the “great assembly” (NIV), “heaven’s court” (NLT), and “His own congregation” (NASB).

This divine council could also be referenced in Nehemiah 9:6, which says, “You alone are the LORD; You have made heaven, The heaven of heavens, with all their host, The earth and everything on it, The seas and all that is in them, And You preserve them all. The host of heaven worships You” (NKJV). The “host” of the “heaven of heavens” are most likely angelic beings. God is the Lord of hosts (Psalm 24:10; Isaiah 44:6). The God who presides in the heavenly council is sovereign over all, including the spiritual beings in His divine council.

Other passages of Scripture describe scenes that could be interpreted as a meeting of the divine council. In Job 1:6, a conclave is held in heaven: “One day the angels came to present themselves before the Lord.” In 1 Kings 22:19, the prophet Micaiah relates a vision: “I saw the Lord sitting on his throne with all the multitudes of heaven standing around him on his right and on his left.” Micaiah goes on to describe how the spiritual beings there suggested various means of accomplishing God’s will, and God chose one spirit to carry out the task. In Daniel 4:17, the angels present a decision made by the divine council: “This decision is by the decree of the watchers, and the sentence by the word of the holy ones, in order that the living may know that the Most High rules in the kingdom of men, gives it to whomever He will, and sets over it the lowest of men” (NKJV). The divine council was in God’s presence and was given the task of deciding Nebuchadnezzar’s judgment and communicating the verdict to Daniel in a dream.

God does not need a divine council to give Him ideas or to approve His decisions. He is the omniscient God Almighty. In His wisdom, God has created a divine council to stand in His presence and graciously allows them to participate in various judgments and decrees.

It is a wonder that God allows created beings to be privy to His ways and even have input in His plan. The divine council is privileged to participate in God’s plans, and, to an extent, so are we: “The prayer of a righteous person is powerful and effective” (James 5:16). And God chooses to use us as ministers of reconciliation in the sharing of the gospel: “Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit” (Matthew 28:18–19; cf. 2 Corinthians 5:18).

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